Tottenham Hotspur station? Some hate it, but branding the railways is nothing new | Ian Jack

From Daimler Halt to Singer station, corporate giants of the past left their imprint on the transport network

Names that were once freely chosen – so freely that you hardly gave them a thought – now come with sums of money attached. Market principles operate. In north London, for example, Tottenham Hotspur FC has reportedly gone to considerable trouble and expense to persuade Transport for London to rename the local railway station after the club. The station, White Hart Lane, has been there since 1872; Spurs moved next door into a ground of the same name much later, in 1899. A pub, the White Hart, had been there long before either.

For all this time and more, the names of public places such as stations and sports grounds arrived as the gifts of geography or history. No longer. In Tottenham, a new stadium has recently been completed adjacent to the old one, and tomorrow the first proper game of football will be played on its turf. Crowd capacity has increased from 36,000 to 62,000 at a cost estimated between £400m and £800m, according to how much non-building work you include. What the club needs, and so far hasn’t found, is a business that will defray some of this expense by buying the naming rights. At present the new ground goes by the name of the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, but this is temporary. The club needs to fit another word in there, somehow: Diageo, Aviva, Nike, Sony, Topshop – that kind of thing.

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Source: Football News
Link : Tottenham Hotspur station? Some hate it, but branding the railways is nothing new | Ian Jack

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